Open and Closed Floor Plans Can be Combined

 Sometimes, a cook just wants plenty to work with. Like a deep sink. Or two.

Sometimes, a cook just wants plenty to work with. Like a deep sink. Or two.

While open floor plans have gained in popularity, there are still holdouts who insist closed floor plans are the way to go. There are pros and cons to each. The critical thing to remember is that each family needs to decide what kind of floorplan suits their needs.

Open floor plans

 A tall breakfast bar will hide the kitchen mess.

A tall breakfast bar will hide the kitchen mess.

The open floor plan came into popularity a couple of decades ago. With it came the ability to make a small house seem bigger and a bigger house look huge. Shared lighting lowered electric bills, and there was more interaction among family members because they could see one another.

 Closed floor plans promote quiet and privacy.

Closed floor plans promote quiet and privacy.

There are other advantages, too. Security is better, because children can be easily watched, and everyone can see when the dog got into the trash. There are fewer walls to decorate,  which gives it a clean look.

While cooks prepare food during parties, they can still entertain guests in an open floor plan. 

Closed floor plans

But, what about people who don’t want all that sharing?

There are those who would argue that, in addition to lighting, one is also forced to share noise. “I am so sick of cooking to the sound of Judge Judy,” said one woman, “but my husband watches her every day!”  Thus, a closed floor plan can benefit those who are annoyed by the sound of a television. The added privacy and quiet of a closed floor plan can also be a benefit for those who have a family but sometimes work from home. 

It may not be just the cook who is annoyed by he open floor plan concept. An open floor plan also shares cooking heat, mess, and odors. When meal preparation involves frying in cooking grease, the heat and smell of cooking are contained in a closed kitchen. Closed kitchens also tend to have more counters, cabinets and storage space.  

Cooks aren’t forced to interact with guests as they cook, and don’t have to share a view of the cooking mess with their guests, either. Some closed kitchen cooks make it a priority to have all of the cooking finished ahead of time so that they can focus solely on their guests. 

 Sometimes, a combination of open and closed floor plans is the best solution.

Sometimes, a combination of open and closed floor plans is the best solution.

 

A compromise

A third option that is gaining attention is a combination or adaptation of one of these plans.  A plethora of compromise solutions are available from which to choose. It could be a half wall, pocket doors, inside windows, or a mini-work area: sort of an island which contains the appliances and sinks needed to cook and hold the mess. A raised counter/eating bar will hide the kitchen mess without sacrificing sociability. 

How to determine which of these options is right for you is to consider your family’s needs and pet peeves. Enjoying your dream may be as easy as figuring out exactly what it is you want. Let your needs and preferences be your guide. 

Remodeling in the Phoenix area? Call us at Arizona Certified Remodeling 602-478-9492.
Or contact us online at http://www.azcertifiedremodeling.com/Contact-Us.html

 

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